Heart Attack

Posted by on May 9, 2013 in Test | 0 comments

The Irish Heart Foundation “Listen to your Heart or not your Head”     Call 999/112 at the first sign of a Heart Attack. Too often people delay in getting to hospital – they don’t want to cause a fuss or they waste vital time calling family or friends first – which can prove fatal.  Our message is simple, don’t die of embarrassment – call 999/112 at the first sign of a heart attack. Heart Attack The heart is a muscular bag which squeezes to pump blood around our bodies. Like all muscles it has its own blood supply and the coronary arteries are responsible for bringing blood to the heart muscle. These arteries can become damaged from a condition called atherosclerosis which involves the build up of plaques on the inner surface of the arteries. If a break occurs in one of these plaques, a blood clot forms at this site in the artery and blocks off the blood supply to some of the heart muscle. If this occurs, the muscle gets damaged and the condition is called a heart attack. Heart attack symptoms: Chest pain Upper body pain in the jaw, back, neck or arms Shortness of breath Sweating Nausea Light-headedness Loss of consciousness Weakness Tiredness The most common symptom of a heart attack is chest pain. This is usually a crushing or tight pain, which may move to your jaw or your arms, particularly on the left side. You may also feel short of breath, sweaty or sick. Some people may feel light-headed or lose consciousness. You may become anxious or very afraid. However 10 to 15 per cent of people who have a heart attack may not feel anything. This is more common in older people, especially women and those with diabetes. Sometimes these people just feel weak, tired or short of breath. Some elderly patients may simply become confused. How is a heart attack diagnosed? Your doctor will make a diagnosis of heart attack based on a number of factors. It is sometimes a very difficult diagnosis to make and it may take a few days to make sure the diagnosis is correct. First of all, the type of chest pain and how long it lasts is very important information to help make the diagnosis. Secondly your doctor will look at an image of the electricity going through your heart called an electrocardiogram (ECG). There are certain patterns on the ECG, which suggest a heart attack. Lastly, your doctor will carry out blood tests, which will help confirm the diagnosis...

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STROKE Recognition

Posted by on May 9, 2013 in Test | 0 comments

Stroke destroys two million brain cells every minute so TIME IS BRAIN. If you suspect that someone is having a stroke call 999 immediately. Read why you need to Act F.A.S.T. when someone is having a stroke. When stroke strikes, act F.A.S.T. The F.A.S.T. acronym was created as a helper for people to remember the main warning signs of stroke so that they ca n act immediately in the case of a stroke by dialling 999. F.A.S.T. stands for: F – Face – has their face fallen on one side?  Can they smile? A – Arms – Can they raise both arms and keep them there? S – Speech – is their speech slurred? T –Time to call 999 if you spot any single one of these signs. F.A.S.T.  can help you to rapidly recognise when a stroke is taking place and then act quickly to get medical treatment and prevent serious damage. The Irish Heart Foundation’s F.A.S.T. campaign In May 2010, the IHF launched a 4-year TV and radio advertising F.A.S.T. campaign. This campaign is being mounted to tackle the frightening lack of public awareness about stroke symptoms in Ireland. In 2009, IHF research showed that less than 50% of Irish adults would ring 999 if they thought they were having a stroke. The hard hitting images in the TV ad show how quickly a stroke can affect a person. The average stroke destroys roughly two million brain cells every minute. So, the quicker a person gets into hospital after a stroke, the more of their brain can be saved. Stroke Action is grateful to the UK Department of Health for giving us permission to use their FAST advertising materials. These ads have been very successful at raising awareness in the UK, resulting in a 55% increase in stroke-related emergency calls. The Stroke Action’s F.A.S.T. campaign won an Irish Healthcare Award 2010 for the Best Patient Education Project non-Pharmaceutical, a Biomnis Healthcare Innovation Award 2011 and a MSD Crystal Clear Health Literacy Award 2011....

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Citizen CPR

Posted by on Jan 24, 2013 in Test | 0 comments

Citizen CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) The Pre Hospital Emergency Care Council, in an effort to encourage bystander CPR or CPR by untrained persons, where a person had collapsed, ran a Television Advertising campaign to promote Citizen CPR. Please see below.   If an adult has suddenly collapsed, is not breathing normally and is unresponsive, they maybe in Cardiac Arrest. There is no time to lose. Even if you are untrained your actions can help. There are two simple actions that you can do to help save their life. Call 999 Push hard and fast in the centre of their chest about 100 – 120 times per minute until the ambulance service arrives. http://www.citizencpr.ie/ Vinnie Jones Hands-only CPR training film The British Heart Fountation teamed up with Vinnie Jones to help thousands of people across the UK survive a cardiac arrest. Now the result has ‘gone viral’, with 2 million people watching Vinnie’s training film online. The film features Vinnie Jones explaining how to give Hands-only CPR to the beat of the Bee Gees’ Stayin’ Alive. It’s backed up by a shorter TV ad and has prompted thousands of people to download alife-saving mobile app and buy limited-edition t-shirts. We already know of at least 25 people who have remembered the campaign and acted on it. When one patient arrived in hospital, the doctor took one look and said, “You’ve been Vinnie’d.”...

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